A traumatic brain injury can interrupt every aspect of a young person’s life after an accident in Tennessee. Motor vehicle crashes and falls are the most common types of accidents that lead to TBIs, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. These accidents are often traumatic enough on their own, but adjusting to life after a TBI can also present a number of challenges.  

Adolescents may not be able to continue extracurricular activities such as sports or academic groups. Concentration and attention at school may suffer. Depression, anxiety, loss of focus, fatigue and frustration are common consequences.  

Psychology Today recommends these tips for young victims coping with the challenges of life after a TBI: 

  • Be patient and willing to ask for and accept help from others 
  • Go slowly and allow for more time to complete activities 
  • When fatigued, take time to rest, relax and sleep 
  • Exercise for stress relief and improvements in attention and sleep patterns 

Getting through a day’s tasks may seem overwhelming. It may be helpful for an adolescent recovering from TBI to: 

  • Break the day into manageable sections and then choose the best time of day to do tasks requiring more mental effort and attention 
  • Record or make notes of information that will be necessary for completing the day’s tasks 
  • Find a place that is quiet and comfortable to complete tasks whenever possible 
  • Recognize signs of fatigue, loss of attention or feeling overwhelmed and take a break 

Caregivers and other adults in a teen’s life should be prepared to offer support and to help the young person seek out social support for encouragement during recovery.